Wednesday 23rd August 2017,

ART

Ξ Leave a comment

Video Art Installations and Found Objects Tell Human Stories

posted by ARTCENTRON
Video Art Installations and Found Objects Tell Human Stories

Dineo Seshee Bopape, Video still from ‘is I am sky, 2013. Digital video, colour, sound. Duration: 17 minutes 48 seconds. Video art.  Photo: © Dineo Seshee Bopape. Courtesy of Stevenson Cape Town, Johannesburg

ART REVIEW

Dineo Seshee Bopape’s experimental video art and sculptural installations of found objects convey human experience

BY KAZAD

Image: Dineo Seshee Bopape's Video art still from 'why do you call me when you  know i can’t answer the phone,' 2012-Art New

Dineo Seshee Bopape, Video still from ‘why do you call me when you know i can’t answer the phone,’ 2012. Digital video, colour, sound. Video art. Photo: © Dineo Seshee Bopape. Courtesy of Stevenson Cape Town, Johannesburg

LONDON When Southbank Centre’s Africa Utopia opens in August, art lovers will get the opportunity to experience the artworks of Dineo Seshee Bopape, one of the most exciting artists emerging from the vibrant contemporary art scene in South Africa today. In her first UK solo exhibition titled Slow-Co-ruption, the artist presents some of her signature artworks of experimental video art and sculptural installations of found objects.

Bopap’s  artworks are characterized by a combination of sound and images merged into kaleidoscopic video art.  The video arts are  creatively incorporated into her sculptural installations to give them broader meaning and perspective.  Bopape’s  installations combine everyday materials such as timber, bricks, mirrors, screens and plants to form loose yet complex configurations.

Bopape’s  works for Slow-Co-ruption include a selection of her video art installed alongside a newly expanded sculpture conceived specifically for the Hayward Gallery Project Space.  Encompassing the gallery space are artificial grass and other everyday materials with which Bopape creates an immersive environment capable of  generating multiple meanings.

ART AUCTION NEWS | READ ALSO: South African Artists Put African Art on Higher Pedestal

Although often described as playful,  many of Bopape’s works are poignant  and packed with deep meanings.  In Same Angle, Same Lighting (2009/2013/2015), for instance, the artist investigates the notion of voyeurism,  insidious surveillance and the incessant need to collect data on everyone in this age of terrorism. Composed of an assemblage of objects that includes a spy camera and a cluster of screens and monitors, the artist also brings to the fore the importance of preserving the environment by observing the consequences of  human activities.

Everyday human experience and how they shape our lives informed Bopape’s Why Do You Call Me When You Know I Can’t Answer The Phone (2012).  At the core of the  digital video art is the idea of love and the complications that come with falling in love.

Bopape’s has had her own experience of how complicated love can be.   Several years ago,  her emotion boiled over into the exhibition space at Mart House Gallery, where she exhibited  works that showed her pain, anger, loss and  lust after a nasty split with an ex-girlfriend.  One of the paintings exhibited at  the Mart House Gallery  was titled You Fucking Horrible Horrible Horrible Bitch!. That emotional experience  is also referenced  in Why Do You Call Me When You Know I Can’t Answer The Phone. The video art examines the over-saturation of human experience, and the fact that  life can sometimes be overwhelming.

Alongside  the art installations are Bopape’s Grass Green (2008) video art installations. Exploring the unrefined aesthetic of analogue video, the artist creates surreal digital montages accompanied by fractured soundtracks of music and sound effects. The disorientating, often out of focus, close-up of fields of grass  bridge the gap between  installation, adding deeper meaning  to her works.

Curated by Cliff Lauson, Hayward Gallery Curator and Rahila Haque, Hayward Gallery Assistant Curator,  Slow-Co- ruption  brings to the fore the creative depth and  impact of this South Africa artist. Drawing on her  experience as a South African and experience of  global issuesBopape  eclectic collection engages viewers with powerful socio-political and metaphysical notions of memory, narration and representation. Her profound understanding of  video art history make this show very significant.  The combination of video art, color, sound and installations  engenders  a connections between materials and human sensibility

Dineo Seshee Bopape: slow -co- ruption, at  Hayward Gallery Project Space from August 26– 27 September 2015

Image: Dineo Seshee Bopape, Video still from why do you call me when you know i can’t answer the phone, 2012. Digital video art, colour, sound-News

Dineo Seshee Bopape, Video still from ‘why do you call me when you know i can’t answer the phone’, 2012. Digital video, colour, sound. Duration: 10 minutes 42 seconds. Photo: © Dineo Seshee Bopape. Courtesy of Stevenson Cape Town, Johannesburg

Image: Dineo Seshee Bopape, 'but that is not the important part of the story, 2013'. Mixed media-Video art

Dineo Seshee Bopape, ‘but that is not the important part of the story,’ 2013. Mixed media. Meanwhile… Suddenly, and Then, 12th Biennale of Lyon, France. Photo: © Dineo Seshee Bopape Courtesy of Stevenson Cape Town, Johannesburg

Join the art conversation: Share your thoughts and comments-FacebookTwitterGoogle+

FOLLOW ARTCENTRON